Page 14 - GlobalEyes Edition 3 Jun 2011

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GLOBALEYES / EDITION 3
ENVIRONMENT
14
potential impact of
incidents can be restricted
to within the site boundary.
The following is a
brief list of potential
environmental
emergencies that
may arise from
foundry operations.
Safety precautions are
paramount when it comes
to handling environmental
emergencies.
To that end, every Bradken
facility has procedures
in place to minimise the
impact of an emergency
– whether it’s a natural
disaster, like the floods
and cyclones we’ve
experienced recently,
or an onsite crisis caused
by other influences.
ENVIRONMENTAL
EMERGENCIES
POSSIBLE EMERGENCY
POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT EXAMPLES
Fire possibly caused by:
• Molten metal spill
• Water in scrap explosion
• Flammable gas leaks
Fire water contamination of the
storm water system
Chemical fumes affecting employees,
vegetation and nearby neighbours
Fire in flammable goods yard
Smoke from fire drifting towards
employees or neighbours
Baghouse failure
Heavy dust fallout on or near neighbours
Damaged bags in baghouse
Liquid chemical spills
Contamination of soil and storm and
ground water systems
Spills of oil, fuels, resins, solvents,
catalysts, hardeners, paints
Solid chemical spills
Contamination of soil and storm and
ground water systems
Asbestos sheet damage, spills of
molybdenum oxide, baghouse dusts,
sands and slags
Odorous chemical spills
Odour nuisance affecting employees
and near neighbours
Amine (DMEA), methyl formate,
paint solvents
Gas container failure
Fire and evacuation of employees and
nearby neighbours
LPG, Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide
Regulated waste
contaminating another site
Soil contamination
Baghouse dusts sent or delivered to
wrong address, asbestos sheet damage
Natural disasters
Damage from floods, bushfires, lightning strikes,
hail storms, earthquakes, climate change
Damage to buildings and equipment,
loss of chemicals to storm water
Onsite, our greatest risk
comes in the handling of
hazardous chemicals,
especially liquids.
As a precaution against
the risk of a major
emergency, most of our
chemicals are purchased,
stored and used in
relatively small containers
– generally 200 litre drums
or 1,000 litre containers.
By limiting them to such
small volumes, the